Amish Country

The Amish are a group of traditionalist Christian church. The Amish are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann. Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.

In the early 18th century, many Amish emigrated to Pennsylvania for a variety of reasons. Today, the most traditional descendants of the Amish continue to speak Pennsylvania German, also known as Pennsylvania Dutch.

The rules of the church : prohibitions or limitations on the use of power-line electricity, telephones, and automobiles, as well as regulations on clothing.

There were about 250 000 Amish in 2010.

There is four main order in Amish :

– The Old Order Amish, who live in rural communities in North America and are famous for their plain dress and limited use of technology.

Amish Mennonites, a broad term used for churches which split from the Old Order Amish, mostly in the 1880s. Some have a lifestyle similar to the Old Order Amish, while others do not.

– The Beachy Amish (formed in 1927), who have fewer limits on the use of technology and do not shun those who join Mennonite churches.

-The New Order Amish (formed in 1966), the least restrictive Amish group. They permit the use of electricity in the home and do not practice shunning.

Hearty cuisine with food from the farm: vegetables, chicken, or beef … The cuisine is simple and balanced .

 

F. Maigret & J. Percheron.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s